EASTER CHURCH IS CALLING

EASTER 2013

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki

What does Easter mean? What does it mean to you? The answers to these questions are not necessarily the same.

Christian Easter refers to the resurrection of Jesus on Easter morning.

Bible’s four Gospels all report the same event, but each in a slightly different way. For example, who were the first Easter morning named guests at the tomb of Jesus?

According to Matthew, Mary Magdalene and “the other Mary”, according to Mark, Mary Magdalene, Mary, the mother of James, and Salome, according to Luke, Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James, and according to John, Mary Magdalene.

All four gospels mention that Mary Magdalene was at the tomb on Easter morning. For the other women, the stories are different.
This is, of course, a challenge, the reports are not identical. These texts cannot be harmonized. Is the Bible therefore worthless?

The Lutheran church is not fundamentalist, that is, Lutherans do not believe in the Bible literally. Lutherans take the Bible seriously, but not literally.

The Easter morning reports contain so-called “mythos” material, the stories seem to refer to an important issue without a great deal of concern about the details. Easter message is not in its literal description, but in its meaning.

Easter for Christians is a celebration of life and hope. The physical body of Jesus hung on the cross, Jesus life’s work rose from the dead. Paul describes the church as the body of Christ – it is the resurrection. Good Friday’s immense sorrow is turned into Easter morning’s jubilating joy. Jesus’ disciples left grief behind them and they became bold preachers of the gospel. Jesus is alive, the Roman mighty empire could not defeat him.

What does Easter mean to you?

You are most welcome to Easter worship service

Jarmo Tarkki
Pastor, Finnish Lutheran Church of California and Texas

Come to hear the rest of the Easter message on Sunday, March 24, Incarnation Lutheran Church, Poway, 16889 Espola Rd., Poway, CA. We will begin our worship service at 4 p.m., followed by coffee.

011 JARMO TARKKI

PÄÄSIÄINEN 2013

Mitä pääsiäinen merkitsee? Mitä se merkitsee sinulle? Vastaukset näihin eivät välttämättä ole samat.

Kristillinen pääsiäinen viittaa Jeesuksen ylösnousemukseen pääsiäisaamuna.

Raamatun neljä evankeliumia kertovat kaikki samasta tapahtumasta mutta jokainen hiukan eri tavalla. Esimerkiksi, ketkä olivat pääsiäisaamun ensimmäiset nimeltä mainitut vieraat Jeesuksen haudalla?

Matteuksen mukaan Magdalan Maria ja ”se toinen Maria”, Markuksen mukaan Magdalan Maria, Jaakobin äiti Maria ja Salome, Luukkaan mukaan Magdalan Maria, Johanna ja Jaakobin äiti Maria, Johanneksen mukaan Magdalan Maria.

Kaikissa neljässä evankeliumissa kerrotaan Magdalan Marian olleen haudalla pääsiäisaamuna. Muiden naisten osalta kertomukset ovat erilaiset.

Tämä on tietysti haaste, kertomukset eivät ole yhtenevät. Näitä tekstejä ei voi harmonisoida. Onko Raamattu siis arvoton?

Luterilainen kirkko ei ole fundamentalistinen, ts. luterilaiset eivät usko Raamattuun kirjaimellisesti. Luterilaiset ottavat Raamatun vakavasti, eivät kirjaimellisesti.

Ylösnousemuskertomus sisältää ns. ”mythos” –aineistoa, kertomuksilla näytetään viittaavan johonkin tärkeään asiaan ilman suurta huolta yksityiskohdista. Pääsiäisen sanoma ei ole kirjaimellisessa kuvauksessa, vaan sen merkityksessä.

Pääsiäinen on uuden elämän ja toivon juhla. Jeesuksen fyysinen ruumis roikkui ristillä, Jeesuksen elämäntyö nousi kuolleista. Paavali kuvaa kirkkoa Kristuksen ruumiina – siinä on ylösnousemus. Pitkäperjantain suunnaton suru on kääntynyt pääsiäisaamun riemukkaaksi iloksi. Suuren pelon vallassa olleet Jeesuksen oppilaat panivat surun taakseen ja heistä tuli sinnittömän rohkeita evankeliumin julistajia. Jeesus elää, Rooman mahtava valtakunta ei voinut kukistaa häntä.

Mitä pääsiäinen merkitsee sinulle?

Sydämellisesti tervetuloa pääsiäismessuun,
Jarmo Tarkki
Kalifornian ja Teksasin Suomikirkon siirtolaispappi

007 JARMO TARKKI

Tervetuloa sunnuntaina, maaliskuun 24. päivänä suomalaiselle kirkolle, Incarnation Lutheran Church, Poway, 16889 Espola Rd., Poway, CA.  Aloitamme messun klo 16.00, jonka jälkeen kirkkokahvit.

ART, SCIENCE AND SPIRIT

 

Dr. Professor’s Thesis of Evil got its Hollywood premiere.

THESIS OF EVIL

The Finnish trio from Oulu, Jukka Vidgren, Juuso Laatio and Petteri Staven recently visited Hollywood, where their 35-minute short film Dr. Professor’s Thesis of Evil was shown at the L.A. Short Film Festival. I sat down with the men to discuss their movie, which they describe as a dark comedy.

All the men hail from the northern city of Oulu, which in the last decade has emerged as a high tech hub. Petteri works at Nokia as a motion designer. Juuso and Jukka have a production company – they make commercials and music videos.

 

Jukka Vidgren, Juuso Laatio, Petteri Staven, Juha Nieminen

Where did you meet each other?

“Juuso and I were media students at Oulu University. Juuso is more into graphics design, photography and I am more into producing. We knew each other way back from school. This film actually started as our final thesis for the university, but it grew from there to a full-blown indie production” director Jukka Vidgren, 29, says.

“We made it with a technique called “motion novel”. We took photographs of our actors, made backgrounds with computer graphics and then blended them together, added sound effects, voiceover and music. It’s a new kind of a narrative technique,” Vidgren explains.

In other words, the actors in the film are presented as still images and the movement is limited to other elements, such as smoke, fire and other special effects.

Do you have to be an actor in a motion novel?

“Yes, it’s a still image, in which you have to convey a specific emotion. You only get one frame to cover a whole lot of dialogue.”

Where did you find your actors?

“Here and there. We had to use actors whom we knew. The villain is played by Pentti Korhonen. He is an actor in the Theater of Oulu. The others were students and other people we knew.”

 

The voice actors were cast in Canada and the U.S.. They were compensated for their work with a grant from the Finnish Film Foundation. In addition to that, they collected 8,000 euros from crowd funding.

 

Director Jukka Vidgren in front of the Graumann’s Chinese Theater in Hollywood.

What is your movie about?

“It’s like a superhero story with a super villain. The film is about a super villain, who is the most successful and known super villain in the world – Dr. Professor. He is trying to take over the world. Our hero is Alphaman, a superman kind of a figure, who is trying to destroy Dr. Professor’s plans.”

The idea reminds me of another new Finnish sci-fi movie, Iron Sky – why is that genre so popular in Finland right now?

“Genre films in general are getting big in Finland. Sci-fi is one of them. I don’t know if I would categorize our film as a sci-fi movie – it’s a fantasy film. We have had very few genre movies of any kind in the past – action, sci-fi or fantasy. They appeal to our generation of filmmakers, who were born in the early 1980’s,” Jukka Vidgren believes.

How long did it take you to make this movie?

“About two and a half years. We had a small team of ten people and only ten days to shoot in the studio with actors. The post-production took about a year and a half.”

The title Dr. Professor’s Thesis of Evil was Juuso Laatio’s idea. He also served as the director of photography.

“I took all the pictures and did about 95% of the photoshop –keying the characters from backgrounds and doing all the color work and stuff. Petteri did the moving parts and there were many other people involved as well,” Laatio, 31, specifies.

Petteri Staven’s job title is motion visualist.

“I took the layers of the photoshop, which Juuso did and processed them in the after effects, which is also an Adobe product, so it was easy. The movement was not based on characters but smoke, fire and gunshots,” Staven, 27, explains.

How did you get to the LA Short Film Festival?

“We submitted our movie and it was accepted. It was pretty awesome, because we get to attend the opening night with some pretty big names and studios, like Marvel. We had conversations with other filmmakers and industry insiders,” Jukka Vidgren reveals.

 

Thesis of Evil is available on iTunes.

The filmmakers are already working on their next film, which is going to be a feature film. You can buy Thesis of Evil on iTunes for $1.99.

For more info go to: http://www.thesisofevil.com/

 

Juha Nieminen started his space studies at USC.

SPACEMAN

32-year-old M.Sc. Juha Nieminen was inspired by space after reading the recently deceased Neil Armstrong’s memoirs. This fall he began to study for a space technology Master’s degree in Space Technology at the prestigious University of Southern California, USC. He immediately joined the university’s hockey team. Thus, the first Finnish person whom he met in LA was the hockey player Saku Koivu. So far, the students have been lectured by Virgin Galactic’s president and an Apollo astronaut. About 1,500 foreign students at USC study space technology – the vast majority of them Chinese and Indian. Juha’s focus is the design of a new generation rocket engine. After graduation, Juha is allowed to work in the U.S. for a year. He would like to get a job in his field in Southern California, a hub for start-up space companies. Juha dreams of being able to travel in space one day. Meanwhile, the rocket man gets around on his bicycle, as he doesn’t have a car yet.

 

Juha Nieminen at USC

ACTING COACH

Beautiful, slim, dark and fiery Marjo-Riikka Mäkelä is a Karelian girl from  Lappeenranta, Eastern Finland. She studied drama in Århus, Denmark, as well as in Moscow and Amsterdam. MR arrived in the United States in 2004. Five years ago she graduated from Long Beach State University with a Master’s in Drama.  She was married for a while but has since divorced. At school actor-colleagues used to turn to her for help in different scenes, for she was able to shed tears at command and live each part to the fullest. So teaching came to her naturally. Today, Marjo-Riikka, 41, teaches in two drama schools in Los Angeles. She also has private students, and occasionally gives drama courses at various universities. Each week, she teaches about a hundred actors.

 

Marjo-Riikka Mäkelä teaches acting at the Chekhov Studio International.

The average person might think it is enough when an actor learns his lines, puts on a costume and then tries to bring the character alive. But as any professional, an actor needs tools to accomplish this. According to Marjo-Riikka, an actor is an explorer of humanity. She teaches Michael (Mikhail), Chekhov’s acting technique. This Chekhov was Russian playwright Anton Chekhov’s nephew, who moved to the U.S. after the Russian revolution. Marilyn Monroe, Yul Brynner, and Robert Stack used his technique. Clint Eastwood is one of the living disciples of it. In short, the technique stresses empathizing with the character and learning different emotions kinetically. As a result, the learning process is physical.

 

Marjo-Riikka takes a physical approach to drama coaching.

On a recent Sunday I got to attend a rehearsal Marjo-Riikka gave at the Chekhov Studio International. There were 10 students attending – seven women and three men – the vast majority of them young adults in their twenties and thirties. The venue was a dance studio with mirrored walls and bars. The students wore track suits and and were working bare-footed.  A random visitor could well have mistaken these for dance rehearsals. The session was very physical indeed – breathing exercises, throwing a ball back and forth with one’s acting partner and taking steps back and forth while reciting lines. The students were rehearsing a new play about Marilyn Monroe and the Kennedy clan. I even saw a Spanish-speaking Marilyn! She was played by a  Chilean girl, who spoke her lines in Spanish. Middle-aged Roxette Wilson is already a successful actor in her native Australia. She is taking lessons from Marjo-Riikka in order to keep her skills sharp. Marjo-Riikka’s courses last for four to ten weeks.  This was an intensive course and she was preparing to start a master class. Next January Marjo-Riikka Mäkelä will take a breather from teaching to appear in a movie that will be shot in Brazil called the Star and the Cross.

 

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki is formally installed as the new pastor of the Finnish Lutheran congregation in the Western United States.

FINNISH PASTOR’S INSTALLATION

The Lutheran Church of California and Texas invite you to the installation service of Pastor Jarmo Tarkki, PhD. The service takes place at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 958 Lincoln Blvd,Santa Monica, on Sunday, October 21, at 2:00pm.

PASTOR JARMO TARKKI SERVES WESTERN FINNS

Story, pictures: Tomi Hinkkanen

There’s a new pastor in town. Jarmo Tarkki began his tenure as the Lutheran pastor of California and Texas Finns April 1st, 2012.

 

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki

 

“And that’s no April fools joke,” he quips about his starting date.

The very first impression of the man is that he smiles a lot. I get to attend the first sermon at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Santa Monica. Tarkki involved the audience in the proceedings by quizzing their knowledge of  charismatic protestant movements of Finland. He also performed a baby boy’s baptismal to the horror of the boy himself, who kept crying throughout the rite. Afterwards there was a coffee and cake reception for the new pastor. A week later we sit down for an interview with the good pastor at the Glendale Hilton, while he was attending a meeting of Lutheran pastors.

Jarmo Tarkki at St. Paul’s Cathedral in Santa Monica

His official title is Finnish Minister of California and Texas Finns. It is an office of American Evangelical Lutheran Church, but by agreement, his salary is paid by the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church. There were 17 applicants to this job. Previously Tarkki had a post in the Danish Lutheran Church in Solvang, California, where he still resides (Although he does not speak Danish, he tells). Jarmo Tarkki first came to the United States in 1978 while working on his doctoral thesis on the subject “questioning religious authority.” After receiving his Ph.D. in Theology, Tarkki served as the pastor in Siuntio, Southern Finland and has also served as a prison minister. In the 1990’s he briefly dappled in politics, wrote newspaper columns and appeared as the host of a popular TV talk show “Mars and Venus”. He returned to the States in 1999 and has lived here ever since. This new post as the pastor to the Finnish immigrants just might geographically be the largest Lutheran congregation in the world.

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki

“The congregation consists of the whole of California, Texas and Mexico. I also serve Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico. It has been estimated that there are approximately 60 000 first, second and third generation Finns in California who still identify themselves as such,” the pastor knows.

He has an unusual way of getting around his vast congregation.

“I have my own airplane, Cessna 172, with which I fly from Solvang to San Diego and San Francisco.”

To longer destinations, such as Dallas, he flies on a commercial airliner. Each congregation has a distinctly different flavor.

A reception after services given by Pastor Tarkki in Santa Monica

“Dallas has younger Finns, 30-40 years old, a lot of families with children – Finns who moved there to work for Nokia Siemens Networks and other high-tech companies. We had 105 people there for Mother’s Day worship.”

The pastor squeezes in several functions on these longer trips.

“I flew there Thursday and came back on Monday.  All day Friday, there were many meetings. We had a church that evening, the Council meeting and the new pastor’s barbecue party. It was held in a local Finnish home and was attended by about forty people. On Saturday, there was the end of semester celebration for the Finnish school with children and families involved. Then I held confirmation rehearsals for four  four candidates for confirmation. On Sunday, there was church service, which culminated in the confirmation. After that I went to the home of one newly confirmed, whose family threw him a reception.”

The new pastor was well-received in Dallas.

“The majority of the Dallas congregation are Finnish, though some of them have American spouses. They are open, cheerful, positive people, who keep in close contact with each other out there, even though the newer entrants are fluent in English. However, there is this sort of Finnish community. It is of great importance, especially on holidays such as Mother’s Day or Christmas.”

Pastor Tarkki gave the Easter service in San Diego.

“Beause there is a Nokia research and development in San Diego, it resembles somewhat Dallas. Then there are the academics – researchers, scientists and the like. There are also a few older folk – Armi Kuusela among others participated in the worship, sitting in the front row with her husband Albert. She promised to come back the next time. The San Diego Finnish congregation is a nice, active community.”

Tarkki has a touching memory from his last trip there.

“I went to see an elderly Finnish woman in a retirement home there. She died only a few days after my visit.”

Los Angeles feels like a typical Finnish community to Tarkki. About 40 people attended his inaugural worship in Santa Monica.

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki with Suomi-Koulu (Finnish school), teacher Mira Scott at St. Paul’s Church in Santa Monica

There is an entirely new congregation in the making in Silicon Valley.

“I assume that in Silicon Valley there are probably similar people as in Dallas. In Berkeley, there is a Finnish Church, the Lutheran Church of the Cross. They had a Finnish pastor there before. There is a Finnish deaconess there, who has presided over services there from time to time.”

The idea is to have Finnish church services in each of the locations six times a year. In addition, Tarkki will travel to Mexico City on December 15th to give services there to the consular staff.

Jarmo Tarkki wants to invite all western Finns to his church service.

“I want to inform Finnish residents that such a possibility of  having a worship service now exists six times a year in these different places. And if someone has a need to contact the minister – whether it be a discussion of pastoral care, baptisms, weddings or funerals – so they can now be handled from here.”

“The idea is to integrate the local Finns in the American Lutheran Church, rather than creating Finnish ghettoes here, where services are given only by Finnish pastors.”

Pastor Tarkki points out that this approach differs from the Swedish model, in which separate Swedish congregations are encouraged.

“In this sense, the Finnish model is really good. When there are no Finnish church services, the congregation is encouraged to attend the American Lutheran Church.”

What is amazing is that Tarkki does all this without any help – he doesn’t even have an assistant. So, this reporter encourages you all to give generously when the collection times comes. There is always need for extra this and that in the church.

Tarkki’s new Finnish congregation differs from his former Danish-American one.

“In Solvang, I did a lot of pastoral work over the phone. People called on all sorts of things. Some Finns will call as well, but the threshold for them to call is higher than for Americans. They are more used to it.”

Church plays a significantly larger role in American lives than it does in Finns’  lives.

“I don’t think there are big differences in terms of religiousness, but the social interaction is totally different here. Our American churches have a strong social function. Many younger people use them as dating venues. The church also has a networking task – reaching out to people. Americans move a lot. If you are a member of  the Lutheran church, by joining a new Lutheran congregation, you will instantly gain a network of a couple hundred people. Among them, there is almost certainly a person for every purpose, whether you need a lawyer or a doctor.”

Jarmo Tarkki says that church plays a large role in American lives.

In Finland, on the other hand, the church no longer plays a significant role in connecting people.

“In Finland, there is substantially less need for that. People move around less and they create their networks in other ways. When no one attends church, it is difficult to create any kind of a network.”

In some ways the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church can blame itself for becoming irrelevant. YLE 2 – a TV channel in Finland aired a gay-themed night in the fall of 2010. The Finnish panelists affiliated with the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church largely condemned homosexuality, causing tens of thousands of Finns to resign from the church within weeks of the broadcast. Jarmo Tarkki has dealt with the issue in his own church and former congregation.

“The U.S. Lutheran church made its decision three years ago. After all, it has ordained openly gay people as pastors for a long time. The burning question was: Can a person living in a homosexual relationship be ordained. It had previously been prohibited, but even that was permitted at that time three years ago.”

Tarkki agrees with the decision.

“In my opinion, the American Lutheran Church has acted in a fine way and set an example that this should now be followed elsewhere.”

The American Evangelical Lutheran Church was present at this year’s Gay Pride march in West Hollywood.

He says he has no problem presiding over same sex weddings.

“I could do it even today. It is a matter of state law. When California allowed same-sex marriages, I announced that if anyone should ask such a blessing, I’m willing to wed them and I do not see in any kind of problem in it.”

Tarkki extended his offer to his parish in Solvang, but in the rural community no such couples stepped forward. He had earlier held a series of discussions on the subject with his parishioners.

“There were some people who presented loud and strong views. Others are made equally strong views of an opposite opinion. We had agreed beforehand that this is a secure location to speak. Everyone has the right to express their views, but must also listen to others. We dealt with these things so much that when the  American Evangelical Lutheran Church finally made its decision, it was no longer a novelty.”

Tarkki criticizes the church as a whole on human rights.

“The church should always defend the human rights of those who are in need of defending. This includes all minorities, whether racial, religious, or of sexual orientation. We should now be in the world today where the Church has no right to discriminate. It is a shocking situation that a private employer cannot discriminate a person based on his or her sexual orientation, but the church can. It should be the other way around – the church should have led the way.”

Jarmo Tarkki thinks the church leaders in Finland are too timid on human rights as not to “rock the boat”.

“I once had a long person-to-person meeting at the Cathedral Chapter with the Helsinki Bishop Eero Huovinen. We talked about this. Bishop Huovinen thought, as many of the bishops think, that the bishop’s main role is to ensure that the church ship does not sway. I said to him, that it is difficult to rock the church boat, when it’s already half submerged!”

He says in Finland the church is known mainly for the things it opposes.

“The Church has distinguished itself by what it opposes, not by what it is for. That the Church opposes abortion, stores being open on Sundays – supposedly on the grounds that if the stores were open on Sunday mornings, people would not come to church. Well, they will not go there anyway! And then the gay debate. I think that people will form the impression that the Church always opposes something.”

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki criticizes the Finnish Evangelical Lutheran Church on being known mainly for what it opposes.

The immigrant pastors work sometimes takes Tarkki to unusual places and situations.

“I received word from a prison priest in Finland that I know. He said there is a Finnish inmate in a Las Vegas detention center – if I could visit him? Well, I flew to Vegas on my plane. It took a full day to arrange the half an hour meeting at the Clark County Jail with the detainee. He was visibly surprised and delighted that a Finnish pastor came to see him. It was an interesting meeting. I told him we can talk about anything he wants. That started the conversation. Now, this is exactly what I think the actual work of  Church should be.”

Then there was a rather unusual baptismal the pastor was sent to perform.

“I got a request from Ridgecrest to baptize the child of Finnish couple. Ridgecrest is located in Indian Wells Valley, the middle of a desert. Again, I flew there on my plane. The child’s father came to pick me up and was glad to know that the pastor comes from the sky. Then we went to his house. The mother’s parents were visiting from Finland. It turned out that the father is a Finnish Air Force engineer. He develops the F-18 fighter jet Hornet’s computer systems in the nearby China Lake Naval Air Station. We had a completely Finnish baptismal with hymns and all.”

Pastor Tarkki reminisces about unusual situations that his work sometimes gets him into.

There was also a very untraditional wedding that Jarmo Tarkki performed.

“A Finnish couple wanted to get married in San Diego. It was Saturday, and I had to fly there from Solvang. We had agreed that I’d be there that morning. But that day it was still foggy at noon, so I couldn’t take off. Finally at 1 pm the fog had lifted and I was able to get on the way, flying there over Catalina island. I had called the couple before taking off, telling them I was in a tight spot: I had a wedding rehearsal back in Solvang that same evening. I asked them to come to the airport, so I could marry them right there. They were very excited. So, I married them at the end of the runway and had the reception in a nearby private air terminal. Then I jumped on my plane and flew back to Solvang, just in time for the wedding rehearsal.”

Jarmo Tarkki and Dean Nelson, Bishop of the Southwest California Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America

Pastor Jarmo Tarkki will be officially sworn in as the minister of the Finnish congregation by Dean Nelson, Bishop of the Southwest California Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America. The ceremony is set to take place in Santa Monica, California on October 21st, 2012.

See you at the worship services!

THE HARTIKAINEN FAMILY STORY

Story, pictures: Lena Hartikainen – West Palm Beach, FL

The Hartikainen family - from the left: Nico, Seppo, Lena and Robert

It was May 1999  in  Helsinki. My husband, Seppo Hartikainen came to me and asked, “If I was to be offered a job in America, would you go with me? Spontaneously I replied: “Sure as long as it is not Florida!

Lo and behold, its now 2012 and I’m writing this, out of all places, in Florida. But back to 1999.  My husband is a Lutheran pastor and in August 1999 he was offered a  job to serve at the Finnish Lutheran Church in Seattle,WA.  We though it would be a nice one-to-three-year experience. Our sons, Nico “the drummer” was 12 and Robert a first grader. We are still on that same trip.

The Hartikainens settled in a Seattle suburb called Edmonds, purchasing a fixer-upper there.

When our good friend in Portland, Oregon heard that we are moving to Seattle, he predicted it will take us exactly five minutes to get used it. It proved out to be true. Naturally, the fact that we had both spend quite a bit of time in Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada, which is literally next-door, helped, as we had many friends in the Pacific North West region already.

We loved every minute of the seven and a half years that we lived there, except the traffic. My worst traffic experience was on Monday after Thanksgiving in 2006, when I got stuck on the freeway for nine hours in an ice and snowstorm!

The first years were a bit of a struggle financially for us, as it took longer than we expected to get work permit for me. So I spent the first two years renovating an old house built in the 1950’s . For a city girl from Helsinki, who has never even held a hammer in her hand, I have to say I did pretty good job. I learned how to paint, sand hardwood floors, build drywalls, lay tiles and you name it.

Lena renovated the Hartikainen family home by herself.

I loved every corner of that old house. It was a house with an unfinished basement, which we totally finished adding some 1, 000 square feet of  living space. Eventually we even added a sauna. The house was located in the suburbs of Seattle in a little town called Edmonds. It has a terminal where the ferries take you to the Olympic Peninsula.

The Washington state ferries dock in Edmonds.

It was a quaint little town with a lot of charm. We had the Pacific ocean/Puget Sound within walking distance from our home. We couldn’t have asked for more. The public schools were great and our kids blended in in no time. For the 12-year-old Nico, it took a bit longer as he was missing his friend. However, the language of music is the same everywhere. Since he was a talented drummer, the other kids and his music teacher adored him. Nico was enrolled in the pre-IB program and eventually graduated with the IB-diploma from Edmonds-Woodway High School.

The Edmonds marina

It took less for Robert to adapt as he was such an easy going little kid. On the first day however, he was a bit nervous and asked me what he should say if someone says something. “Just use what ever language skills you have and it’ll be ok,” I advised him. So we walk into the room together. As he walks in, he says: “hastala vista baby, I’ll be back!” That was all he knew in “English”. “This boy will do just fine,” the teacher smiled. And so he did.

 

While living in Washington, Lena had to re-invent herself.

While doing the renovation, I studied for a new career. Professional Life Coaching was not well known yet in the year 2000. My original intention had been to continue my studies in Social Psychology, but as an out-of-state student, the tuition was totally out of my reach, so I found coaching.

 

The Hartikainens

In Finland, I had worked for Pan Am, Delta and China Airlines in various positions – sales, customer service and management for some 10 + years.  But the travel industry jobs were scarce in the late summer of 2001 when I received my green card. Especially after 9/11 they became almost extinct. I still managed to get a job with a tour operator. My job was to organize tours to Scandinavia, Finland, Russia and the Baltic states.

My unfinished degree from Finland was bothering me. So, in 2005 I enrolled in the University of  Phoenix, and graduated with B.S. in Management two years later.

While a student, I found a job as a Call Center Manager for AAA Washington. I greatly enjoyed the job for its fast pace and great teamwork.

I also ran my first marathon in November of 2005.

At the end of 2006, my husband told me there was an opportunity for him in Florida. So in February of 2007 we found ourselves in the Sunshine State. This time just our younger son Robert came with us.

After living in the Pacific Northwest for seven years, Lena Hartikainen found herself in balmier Florida.

Nico was already 20 and had just signed a record contract with Photo Finish Records. He and his band Danger Radio were ready to tour the world. We accepted the fact that one must follow one’s dream.

 

While the rest of the family moved to Florida, the eldest son, Nico Hartikainen pursued his dreams in Hollywood.

Now we are in Florida.

My husband Seppo works at the St. Andrews Lutheran Churchas the Senior Pastor. Robert was enrolled in a small private Lake Worth Christian School in the last quarter of his last year in middle school. Again he acclimated to new surroundings without any qualms.

 

The Hartikainens at church

In 2007 recession hit Florida, which again made it challenging for me to land a job. I used my coaching skills to help others find jobs and develop their careers by launching FindYourJuice-coaching.  But I missed the energy of a larger company. While wondering how to get integrated into the local business world, I co-founded the Finnish American Chamber of Commerce Florida with three other businesspeople. I soon discovered the Finnish companies needed more help than what the chamber could offer. So, with another entrepreneur, I co-founded  Optimus Consulting Group Inc. in February of 2011. The first year has been full of excitement and hard work, which is starting to pay off. I look forward to each working day!

 

Lena Hartikainen went into business by herself in Florida, founding a consulting company.

Meanwhile Robert has graduated from high school and is finishing his first year in Palm Beach State College. Nico has lived in L.A. for the last five years, producing music, both independently and working as a sound engineer for Atlantic Records.

 

Nico Hartikainen is making a career in Hollywood as a sound engineer and a song writer.

Now that we live in Florida, a steadier stream of visitors come from Finland – most likely due to the more favorable climate and the pool in the backyard.

We did not want to acquire another renovation job in Florida, but purchased a house that had been recently upgraded. Our little Oreo-dog has been with us since 2003 and is loved by visitors and family alike.

The Hartikainen family pool attracts visitors from Finland.

Naturally, due to the role my husband has with the church and I with the FACC we have strong connections to the local Finnish community. So much so, that we don’t feel the need to visit Finland that often – perhaps every two or three years. The boys seem to long for Finland even less, as they are busy with their own lives.

Lena Hartikainen on the beach with her mom, Sisko Antturi

I can’t say I miss anything specific from Finland anymore, as the world is so global and even “näkkileipä” and rye bread can be found at a local supermarket. Naturally we miss family and friends.

The Hartikainen family has happily settled in the United States.